Monday, May 31, 2010

Memorial Day

"...gather around their sacred remains and garland the passionless mounds above them with choicest flowers of springtime....let us in this solemn presence renew our pledges to aid and assist those whom they have left among us as sacred charges upon the Nation's gratitude,--the soldier's and sailor's widow and orphan." --General John Logan, General Order No. 11, 5 May 1868

How we should observe Memorial Day

The "Memorial" in Memorial Day has been ignored by too many of us who are beneficiaries of those who have given the ultimate sacrifice. Often we do not observe the day as it should be, a day where we actively remember our ancestors, our family members, our loved ones, our neighbors, and our friends who have given the ultimate sacrifice:

*by visiting cemeteries and placing flags or flowers on the graves of our fallen heroes.

*by visiting memorials.

*by flying the U.S. Flag at half-staff until noon.

*by flying the 'POW/MIA Flag' as well (Section 1082 of the 1998 Defense Authorization Act).

*by participating in a "National Moment of Remembrance": at 3 p.m. to pause and think upon the true     meaning of the day, and for Taps to be played.

*by renewing a pledge to aid the widows, widowers, and orphans of our falled dead, and to aid the disabled veterans.

Memorial Day, originally called Decoration Day, is a day to remember those who have died in our nation's service. After the Civil war many people in the North and South decorated graves of fallen soldiers with flowers.

In the Spring of 1866, Henry C. Welles, a druggist in the village of Waterloo, NY, suggested that the patriots who had died in the Civil War should be honored by decorating their graves. General John B. Murray, Seneca County Clerk, embraced the idea and a committee was formed to plan a day devoted to honoring the dead. Townspeople made wreaths, crosses and bouquets for each veteran's grave. The village was decorated with flags at half mast. On May 5 of that year, a processional was held to the town's cemeteries, led by veterans. The town observed this day of remembrance on May 5 of the following year as well.

Decoration Day was officially proclaimed on May 5, 1868 by General John Logan in his General Order No. 11, and was first observed officially on May 30, 1868. The South did not observe Decoration Day, preferring to honor their dead on separate days until after World War I. In 1882, the name was changed to Memorial Day, and soldiers who had died in other wars were also honored.

In 1971, Memorial Day was declared a national holiday to be held on the last Monday in May.
Today, Memorial Day marks the unofficial beginning of the summer season in the United States. Memorial Day Weekend is a three-day holiday that is typified by the first family picnics and barbecues of the year. The Indianapolis 500 Mile Race takes place on the Sunday before Memorial Day.

Memorial Day is still a time to remember those who have passed on, whether in war or otherwise. It also is a time for families to get together for ball games, swimming, and other early summer activities.

I found all of this information browsing around the internet and thought I would share it for everyone to read...
A time to be thankful and remember why we celebrate.  I wish everyone a happy memorial day and I hope you stop and remember and say alittle prayer.

1 comment:

  1. Thank You so much for posting about Memorial Day. My Son is in the Army and has already been to Iraq for 15 months. He now flys Blackhawks and has seen much in His Young Life. Let us Honor ALL those in uniform and Thank the Families that willingly offerred them to this Country in the Purest Fashion.